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Employee Appraisals Under the Spotlight

As we are close to being halfway through the year you might be thinking about whether your organisation is on track to achieve its targets and in turn, how your employees are performing.

Whilst most employers have systems in place to measure organisational and departmental performance, do you have anything in place to help you assess employee performance and set future objectives? If not, you may wish to consider implementing an employee appraisal system.

A Valuable Tool

As employees are often the key to an organisation’s success, appraisals can be a valuable tool for managers. They provide an opportunity to engage in a dialogue with employees about their performance and development and any support they need in their role. They can also be a useful part of creating a record of an employee’s performance should evidence of this be required.

There are different ways of carrying out performance appraisals so it’s important to devise a system that is fair, workable and meets the needs of your organisation and employees.

Appraisals in Practice

When it comes to carrying out appraisals it’s important:

  • Managers take the time they need to appropriately assess each employee’s performance fairly and reasonably against performance objectives.

Preparation for appraisals is crucial if they are to be effective, otherwise they risk being inaccurate or becoming simply a ‘box ticking exercise’. There are often a lot of demands on a manager’s time so it’s a good idea to ensure that your appraisal system isn’t unwieldy in practice.

  • Employees understand the appraisal system and the format it will take.

If employees are comfortable with the process, they will be more likely to engage with it and feel able to have a detailed and open discussion with their manager, particularly in relation to matters such as career goals or training needs.

  • Managers are prepared to deal with the rough as well as the smooth

Whilst it can be hard for managers to have difficult conversations about poor performance, it’s important not to overlook or avoid the issue. The employee may not be aware that improvement is needed or there could be a good explanation for the situation, such as an unidentified training need that won’t come to light unless the issue is raised. Whatever the situation, if it’s left unaddressed, it’s unlikely matters will improve on their own.

If you would like to discuss employee appraisals or you have an employment law matter you need assistance with, please do not hesitate to contact Kingfisher Professional Services Ltd as we are happy to help.